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The Thing About Einstein (and Heisenberg)

Yesterday I spoke about the social nature of the scientific systems of both Darwin and Goethe and how their examples gave us the freedom to choose new paths of science to match our contemporary needs for healing a rather broken earth. These two great scientists both lived a long time ago. The nature of structured inquiry into the relationship between humans and the earth didn’t stop with them, no matter how profound their contributions were. So, I think it only fair to dip into newer worlds as well. Today, Einstein (the theory of relativity) and Heisenberg (the uncertainty principle).

Albert_Einstein_Head

Einstein, Who Said “God Doesn’t Play Dice”

The strain of trying to make opposites cohere shows, doesn’t it.

Einstein added the concept of relativity to a system of absolute science, or science that claimed to have found laws that did not change with circumstance. He presented the mathematics that encapsulated the idea that notions of time and space are not absolute but are related to the particular circumstances of an observer (or an observing mode of enquiry). That’s a very jewish observation. It comes from a jewish sense of relational ethics, such as both Abraham and Job, not to mention Abraham’s nearly sacrificed son Isaac, learned to their consternation in the Old Testament.

synagogue erfurt

The Erfurt Synagogue

One of the few ancient houses of jewish worship surviving in Germany — a place in which a man could be both a German and not a German at the same time, and it wouldn’t be clear which was at play at any given time until circumstances unfolded themselves. Would one be a jew? Or would one be a German? Only the observer (or the circumstances) could determine it. 

This observation puts Einstein’s science closer to Goethe’s than to Darwin’s, in that both Goethe and Einstein were concerned about the observer’s impressions, while Darwin was concerned with a system that an observer could deduce and then apply to make sense of the world. The two concepts are mirror images of each other. And that was Einstein’s problem. He tried to merge his conception of relative time and space and Heisenberg’s conception that matter is not in a determined state until it is observed, even if there is no observer but only a collision with concepts of solidity, with a humanly observable physical world. From the distance of 2014, the two concepts appear pretty much the same, but the attempt to bring them together proved really frustrating for Einstein. It’s kind of a problem that Goethe foresaw, though, although rather poetically. (But why not. He was a poet, too.) Here is the natural formation that enchanted Goethe most of all, a gingko leaf:

P1140779_2Goethe’s Gingko in Leaf, Jena, Germany

The plant that has both male and female genders in different individuals, and which puts out single leaves that are made out of two conjoined parts… Goethe drew inspiration from this model. It spoke to him of an elementary nature in the earth: bisexual relationships.

Well, that’s Goethe speaking as a poet, but perhaps, all the romantic glory of finding a mathematical formula to join the two concepts aside, that’s all one needs: a poet’s practicality. For an understanding of the nature of matter on earth, it matters not a whit whether it is reduced to a mathematical formula or apprehended instantly through poetry. What matters is the deepening of the human-earth relationship through intellectual activity, and that can take place in poetry as much as it can in science. Perhaps that’s the next step in the ladder from Goethe to Einstein to Heisenberg to Today: human systems of consciousness that can merge the human with the earth.

gnoes

Not This!

Gnomes in Berlin.

Sometimes these ideas work out in very physical ways. It could be that the evidence of the path that lies open to us is right before us, and to find it all we need to do is read the earth and human social space with the same relativistic tools that Einstein and Heidegger applied to mathematical conceptions. Here, for instance, is the 1960s version of an attempt to reconcile Heisenberg’s science with a practical, industrial worldview from the 1890s, and it is ascendant again:

P1170806 Jerusalem Square, Fulda, Germany

The former synagogue of this ancient pilgrimage city was levelled in the Third Reich, and planted thereafter with flowers, as a space for all people and a kind of permanent grave memorial. It is currently in use by drug dealers, cutting deals on burner cell phones.

Not the way to heal human relationships with the earth! Just around the corner, there is more physical manifestation of these scientific principles, again very much from a previous generation:

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Former Jewish Businessman’s Town House, Fulda

Offices now, whereas once it spoke of a marriage between the sacred and the profane.

Still not good enough! One way to move forward is to honour the earth by speaking for her. I can easily do the Goethean thing, and bring the next step in this science forward in imagery. This, for example, is the earth speaking.

moth So is this.

P1140982You will notice that she speaks in neither language nor mathematics, yet mathematics and language are the tools that we have, given to us by our ancestors. It has long been considered the role of artists to find new tools. It is the role of scientists as well. I think it would happen very quickly as soon as the skill sets of poetry were brought back into science and a new Enlightenment, a new mode of knowing were created now, rather than out of the material of the 18th century. That would take courage. We have nothing to lose but our selves, and everything to gain, including new selves. If you want a map of current cities (current maps of the human body, in other words), look no further than this:

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Mariposa Lily, Okanagan Valley (Vernon)

This is urban space. If you don’t see urban space here, look again. And again, until you do.

Currently, human explorations are going towards creating machine selves for humans, rather than addressing human-earth relationships. That is romantic laziness and nothing but Frankensteins will come of it. Let me be clear:

emmendingen Art, Former Fire Alarm (Pigeon), Garbage, Garbage, Recreation

What’s the difference? This urban space in Emmendingen, Germany is a post-biological human. Machine humans are going to be no different.

Granted, something needs to be done.

streetcarStreet Car Lines, Erfurt, Germany

The humans seem so frail in this monstrous human body (city) they have built. Android phone identities for humans are no better. All human creations are projections of social circumstances.

Humans have the ability to humanize nearly anything, but it takes real vision and courage to set that aside and earth-ize humans, to put the earth in our social group, yet that’s exactly what we have to do, and you know what? We’ll make it human, and we will be transformed. What I’m advocating here is hard science and clear, intellectual vision, not romantic nonsense like this:

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“Castle Kitchen”, Castle Frankenstein, Darmstadt, Germany

Annual home of an American Hallowe’en party. It was reconstructed BADLY in the 19th century. No castle ever looked like this.

We can be human or Frankensteins. If we choose Frankensteins, we won’t be human. And that’s the problem with Einstein. He chose to be human, but by wrestling with non-relative science without the benefit of poetry, he had to continually fight for it by an act of his will alone. It should be easier and more physically gracious than that.

leaves

Gingko Leaves, Vernon

Notice how the divisions Goethe loved have almost healed. 

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