Why It’s Called a Grassland

Look what happens! The grass grows, and dries in the sun, to catch the snow. No snow. A raven, though! But look…

… then it snows.

Now the grass is bent in an arc, down to the soil. The energy shift continues. Watch.

The even snowfall is soon uneven, built around structures created by grass, all with exposed faces collecting heat and lee faces collecting cold.

But there’s more! Soon, the hill, one even gradient of soil, becomes a series of waves.

Beautiful waves. Waves created by grass built to bend to the wind. Now it is bending the snow that is carried on the wind. That’s the same thing, isn’t it?

A day later, and the sun begins to work on the faces of heat and cold the grass has made out of the wind.

It creates miniature avalanches, slumps, and flow patterns in the snow, deepening wells and extending connective membranes. The snow will melt in these patterns. But that’s not all!

The grass also guides the deer. The grass turns them into wind.

They follow its patterns. So does the sun. Look at it, spilling between these clumps of snow buckwheat, which are holding the snow.

Just as the deer’s trails are made at the intersection of their angular anatomy, grass and gravity, so are the sun’s trails made at the intersection of their expansive planes, grass and the form of gravity known as exposure. The sun’s trails are flat. Look how grass makes dimension out of this flat world. The tiny avalanches in the image below show the grass at work.

The summer that will build new stalks of grass to harvest and sculpt the sun into the following spring’s water starts here, at first snow.

By the time spring comes along, most of the preparation has been done. Grassland people, this is your snow:

The Sun Doesn’t Fall

This is not a metaphor.p1470521

It is a projection.p1470523

Across 135,000,000 kilometres of travel through emptiness, the sun reforms.p1470527

The earth focusses it.p1470528

Call that fire, that ancient word for coals: red.p1470529

Call that life. It melts the cold.

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That you cannot see the leaf-shaped sun that forms inside the snow and seeks out the earth, doesn’t mean it isn’t there.

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Let’s set the idea of dead matter aside and go back to the earth.

 

 

When Wind is Not Wind

Grass is one of the clever plants of our planet. Look how these grasses are using the weight of snow to bend their stalks down. When the snow falls off in a breeze, or under heating by the sun, the stalks spring back with a snap and, if lucky, release a seed or two, scattering it up to a half metre away.P2160424
And that’s how grass walks!

Light and Dark and Colour are One

Light is a form of darkness.P1640732

Look at these leaves burn their way through the snow, precisely because they are dark.

P1640737 Darkness is a form of energy.

P1640725Notice how bright it is!

P1640708 Notice, too, that it is the snow that is dark.

P1620340 Against it, the dark trees are light (or, at least, bright).orchard In the earliest form of all European languages, black and light were the same thing. The glare or brightness of all the elements in the elm tree below were, to our ancestors, the same startling presence.elm3

You can see a discussion of that here:

Flame: the energy form of passage and transition, present, understood and anticipated, usually manifesting as a leaf of fire, the fire in a leaf, or the potential fire in coal.

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Leaf Burning Through the Snow

That’s from my earth language blog www.earthwords.net

I’m working on what I hope will be tomorrow’s post, about how these observations about light and dark impact culture, science, and art, and what lies beyond the divisions currently accepted as ‘real’. I want to take the time to get it right, so, in the meantime, an image to contemplate:

sun2b

 Sun Burning Through Fog Behind Giant Rye Grass

 Light? Dark? Colour? It’s all the same thing…almost. Tomorrow we’ll talk about that.

 

 

 

Air: The Primary Human Habitat

Our earth is not just a glob of rocks …

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spinning around the sun, and not just vast seas of water sloshing around at the pull of the moon …

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… but is also an air. Like the ocean coast…

heron

 

Heron at Willow Point, looking East. That’s Quadra Island to the left.

… the air has a shore.

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We are intertidal creatures on this shore, like these fellows at Willow Point …

seastar and blob

It’s not just us. The sagebrush, bunchgrass, trees and weeds here…

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… are also intertidal creatures on this shore, reacting to pressures of light, air, wind, atmospheric water, and heat (and to human reactions to them.) It’s easy to think that those are all instantaneous pressure effects, but I don’t know. Look at this snow:

 

P1610800It fell all at once, flat as could be, but it’s melting now, according to patterns, waves shall we say, of wind, and how that has driven the snow, partly in reaction to energies of air and ice crystals, but also to minute edge patterns of heat…

P1610759

 

… and in reaction to the forms of the bunchgrass below the snow, which shapes the snow as much as the wind does, and both through this shaping and through the heat tubes of its stalks, shapes the way in which the sun is drawn into it.stalksnow

 

And not just that! Here’s the snow itself…

snow

 

 

Every grain of snow repeats these effects of sun and shadow, acting in concert, along the vectors of the wind and the other vectors of the hidden grass, to create waves and rivers of focussed light.

timesnow

Snow is time. Here’s an image of the snow above once the patterns of melting have been integrated into the patterns of the grass itself.

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And wouldn’t you know it: grasses, too, are creatures of the wind. This shorescape, this lightly breaking and focussed sky, is the primary human habitat.