Wild Life on the Hanford Reach

Here is a basic guide to life in the Hanford Reach, the last free-flowing (note: not wild, just free flowing) stretch of the American stretch of the Columbia River.

First, the security camera operators…

Second, Canadian tourists asking a local for directions …

Third, a non-unionized member of the cleanup crew…

Fourth, a grass removal specialist, off to make the rounds of the reactor grounds. First, the long shot, to show his native environment …

… and then a closeup to show his work equipment …

Fifth, one of the few remaining members of the water cleanup patrol arrested by two nameless invaders from a tribe of wild animals downriver…

Sixth, other members of the invading tribe working hard to haul a 4.5 foot long young sturgeon from the perhaps isotope rich sludge at the bottom of the river so they can let him go and try again (entombed reactors in the background) …

Seventh, another boat from the rather extensive invasion fleet…

Eight, hope for the future …

I consider the capture and killing of increasingly rare and ancient animals for sport to be rogue behaviour, not befitting membership in the earth community. Compare this to a representation of an elk / human interaction by the original people of the river, who lived on the sites above…

Elk or man? Who is negotiating with whom? The question has a new urgency.

 

 

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